Over 40% of Americans will develop type II diabetes

Just watch New Zealand, Australia, the UK, Canada and all the rest follow along behind unless drastic changes are made to the way we live.

What causes type II diabetes? Overeating a meat-heavy, sugar-rich, low-fibre, highly-processed modern diet alongside poor lifestyle choices.

In 1985, the lifetime risk of diabetes for the average 20-year-old American was 20%.

Now it is 40% and it is seeing no signs of slowing down at all.

Put in simple English: two out of five Americans from the age of 20 are now expected to develop type II diabetes.

“The overwhelming increase in diabetes prevalence has resulted in an almost 50% increase in the cumulative number of years of life lost to diabetes for the population ad a whole. Years spent living with diabetes has increased by 156% in men and 70% in women. We weren’t necessarily surprised that it increased, but we didn’t expect it to increase this much. Forty percent growth is a humbling number”
Dr. Edward Gregg, study leader and Chief of the Epidemiology and Statistics Branch, Division of Diabetes Translation at the Centers for Disease Control and prevention, August 2014.

“The diabetes epidemic is rending people incapable of enjoying a good quality of life. It’s raising health care costs at an alarming rate. And frankly, there aren’t enough health care professionals to deal with what's coming down the pike. We’re looking at clogging up a health care system that’s already stretched to its limits”
Dr. Minisha Sood, Endocrinologist, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York City, August 2014.

"If prevention efforts take hold, then the equation for lifetime risk will change pretty quickly. The thing that’s going to have the biggest effect is if people with multiple risk factors can make sustained changes in their lifestyles. Weight-loss surgery is not going to be the solution for the large number of people at risk for diabetes”
Dr. Edward Gregg, study leader and Chief of the Epidemiology and Statistics Branch, Division of Diabetes Translation at the Centers for Disease Control and prevention, August 2014.

Study by Dr. Edward Gregg, Chief of the Epidemiology and Statistics Branch, Division of Diabetes Translation at the Centers for Disease Control and prevention, and colleagues, “Trends in lifetime risk and years of life lost due to diabetes in the USA, 1985—2011: a modelling study”, from the National Health Interview Survey, and linked data about mortality from 1985 to 2011 for 598 216 adults, as published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, Early Online Publication, 13 August 2014 doi:10.1016/S2213-8587(14)70161-5 .

Posted: Wednesday 20 August 2014