Living well is better for your heart than drugs, genetics or good luck - Part Two

How did diet, lifestyle, smoking, drinking and daily movement affect the heart of those followed for 20 years?

  • Those who followed all 5 heart friendly recommendations had a 60% low-risk profile for heart disease
  • Those who followed 4 heart friendly recommendations had a 37% low-risk profile for heart disease
  • Those who followed 3 heart friendly recommendations had a 30% low-risk profile for heart disease
  • Those who followed 2 heart friendly recommendations had a 17% low-risk profile for heart disease
  • Those who followed 1 heart friendly recommendation had a 6% low-risk profile for heart disease

“It’s long been known that high-fiber diets can help people lose weight, lower cholesterol and improve hypertension. The results of this study make a lot of sense because weight, cholesterol and hypertension are major determinants of your long-term risk for cardiovascular disease”
Dr Donald M. Lloyd-Jones, M.D., chair of the department of preventive medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.

The bottom line was that regardless of genetics or age, the research shows that the biggest influence on your risk of heart disease is how you live your life – not the genes you were born with.

The 2010 Northwestern Medicine Study was based on analysis of participants in the CARDIA (Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults) multi-center longitudinal study (National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute). The researchers looked at 2,336 participants, aged 18-30, for 20 years, tracking movement, diet, smoking, alcohol and blood measurements. Also; A Northwestern Medicine study on 16,455 people age 40-50 over three generations of families in the Framingham Heart Study, 2010. Also; Study published June 30, 2014 in the journal Circulation.  As reported by Northwestern News Center on July 3, 2014.


 

Posted: Saturday 26 July 2014