NZ obesity rates up again in 2014

Sadly, New Zealand obesity rates are up more than 80%, marking the biggest increase recorded in over 200 countries.

The first-of-its-kind Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 covers an analysis of data from 188 countries, by an international consortium of researchers, led by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, at the University of Washington, as published in The Lancet 2014.

“Successive governments in this country had been unwilling to take on the food industry by regulating the marketing of foods causing childhood obesity.  The priority is to protect the health of children and support parents from the pester power created by junk food ads - these are more important than the profits of the junk food industry”
Professor Boyd Swinburn, professor of population nutrition and global health at Auckland University, May 2014.

This is the best description of obesity I have ever seen; “Obesity is a heritable neurobehavioural condition sensitive to environmental conditions”. 

What does this new report tell us about ourselves?

  • Two-third of Kiwis overweight or obese
  • Half of New Zealand’s overweight women are obese
  • Obesity rates for New Zealand women age 20 or older are now 30%
  • The proportion of men classified as obese in New Zealand has increased more than anywhere else in the world over the last 30 years
  • In 1980 it was 13%
  • In 2013 it was 28%
  • In 1980, 18% of New Zealand children were obese
  • In 2013, 29% of New Zealand children were obese
  • Over 33% of New Zealand boys age 10-14 are now overweight or obese
  • The proportion of New Zealand adults considered overweight or obese rose from 50% to 66%
  • This is now 2.2 million people, including 960,000 who were obese
  • Almost 80% of all New Zealand men age 50 to 54, 60 to 64, 65 to 69, and 70 to 74, are now obese or overweight

Study “Global, regional, and national prevalence of overweight and obesity in children and adults during 1980–2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013,” as conducted by an international consortium of researchers led by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) at the University of Washington, as published in The Lancet on May 29, 2014.  As reported by stuff.co.nz, The Sydney Morning Herald and livenews.com on May 29, 2014.

 

Posted: Tuesday 3 June 2014