Eating meat associated with an increased risk of cancer, heart disease and early death

Could we lower cancer and heart disease deaths just by eating less meat? 

Yes it seems to be exactly the case.

“Components of the animal-source foods are linked to cancer.  The need is for a major reduction in total meat intake, an even larger reduction in processed meat and other highly processed and salted animal source food products and a reduction in total saturated fat” 
Dr Barry M. Popkin, Ph.D., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, March 2009.

“These results complement the recommendations by the American Institute for Cancer Research and the World Cancer Research Fund to reduce red and processed meat intake to decrease cancer incidence”
Dr Rashmi Sinha, Ph.D., and colleagues at the National Cancer Institute, March 2009.

What did the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study & National Cancer Institute research, as published in the American Medical Association’s Archives of Internal Medicine Journal find?

  • A high meat intake is associated with an increased risk of esophageal and liver cancer
  • 10% of colorectal cancers could be avoided if people reduced their red and processed meat intake to one or two meals per week
  • 10% of lung cancers could be avoided if people reduced their red and processed meat intake to one or two meals per week
  • Eating more meat gives you an increased risk of death from all causes
  • Eating more meat gives you an increased risk of heart disease within 10 years
  • Eating more meat gives you an increased risk of cancer within 10 years
  • 11% of cancer deaths in men could be prevented if men lowered their intake of meat to one or two meals per week
  • 16% of cancer deaths in women could be prevented if women lowered their intake of meat to one or two meals per week
  • 11% of cardiovascular disease mortality in men could be prevented if men lowered their intake of meat to one or two meals per week
  • 21% of cardiovascular disease mortality in women could be prevented if women lowered their intake of meat to one or two meals per week

Study by Rashmi Sinha, Ph.D., and colleagues at the National Cancer Institute, as published in the March 23, 2009 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association Archives of Internal Medicine. 2009;169[6]:562-571.  This research assessed the association between meat intake and risk of death among more than 500,000 individuals who were part of the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study.  They were then followed for 10 years through Social Security Administration Death Master File and the National Death Index databases.  The study was supported in part by the Intramural Research Program of the National Institutes of Health and the National Cancer Institute, as reported by sciencecodex.com on March 23, 2009.  Also; study by Cross AJ, Leitzmann MF, Gail MH, Hollenbeck AR, Schatzkin A, et al. (2007) “A prospective study of red and processed meat intake in relation to cancer risk” as published in PLoS Medicine 4(12): e325. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.0040325 PLoS Medicine.  As reported by sciencecodex.com.  

Posted: Tuesday 6 May 2014