Alcohol and weight in women are prime drivers of fatal liver disease

Alcohol and weight in women are prime drivers of fatal liver disease

Here is yet another massive international study confirming that alcohol and excessive weight directly leads to fatal liver diseases and liver cancer.

“From 1970-2000, there has been a 10-fold increase in death from cirrhosis among middle-age women in England”
Daniele Prati, MD, of the Ospedale Alessandro Manzoni in Lecco, Italy.

“The combination of a woman’s drinking habits and weight has an important effect on liver health and life expectancy.  Women with high alcohol intake have a greater risk of developing chronic liver disease compared to a woman who doesn’t drink very much.  Women are twice as sensitive as men to alcohol related liver damage and developing a more severe form of the disease at lower doses with shorter durations of alcohol consumption.  Fatty liver and alcohol have long been known as risk factors for liver cancer…
Daniele Prati, European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL).

Alcohol consumption, viral hepatitis B and C and metabolic syndromes related to overweight and obesity, are the leading causes of cirrhosis and primary liver cancer in Europe
The European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL).

“If you’re obese, the damage you can do to yourself by drinking heavily is much greater than if you’re just overweight.  The public health message is enormously important.  People are not aware that they are putting themselves at this risk”
William Rosenberg, MBBS, DPhil, of the University College London.

What has the study confirmed about liver cancer and fatal liver diseases?

  • Being overweight and drinking alcohol TRIPLES the risk of fatal liver disease in women compared to slim non-drinkers
  • Liver disease is now the fifth biggest killer in the alcohol-drenched UK
  • There was a 10-fold increase in death from cirrhosis among middle-age women in England from 1970-2000
  • Liver disease death has risen by 20% over the past decade
  • There are often no warning signs until it is too late to treat
  • Those with alcoholic cirrhosis, fatty liver disease, overweight, obese or type II diabetics are more likely to develop hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common liver cancer
  • In Europe now, 1 in 7 adults drink more than the advised limit

In this study, ‘low alcohol intake’ was classed as two standard drinks per day (!) and a high intake as over two drinks daily (what would they call a drinking problem exactly, a bottle each night?)...

Study by Dr Paul Trembling and Professor William Rosenberg at the UCL Institute of Liver and Digestive Health “Influence of BMI and alcohol on liver-related morbidity and mortality in a cohort of 108,000 women from the general population from UKCTOCS; Abstract 115” as presented on Thursday April 25 at the 2013 International Liver Congress in Amsterdam in The Netherlands.  As reported by Medical News Today on 25 Apr 2013, MedPage Today on April 26, 2013 and The Daily Mail on April 26, 2013.

Posted: Thursday 14 November 2013