Diet directly shown to extend life and lower mortality in older people

Diet directly shown to extend life and lower mortality in older people

The massive study “Does overall diet in midlife predict future aging phenotypes? A cohort study” as published in the May 2013 edition of The American Journal of Medicine, confirms yet again that aging and health is all about diet and lifestyle.

People eating the typical modern, processed, sugar-rich and meat-rich diet:

  • Were 50% less likely to reach old age
  • Were 50% less likely to age without disease
  • Had a 53% greater chance of cardiovascular death
  • Had a 36% greater chance or noncardiovascular death
  • Had poorer musculoskeletal status (weak bones)
  • Had worse cognitive function (a weak mind)

The basic summary is that eating a healthy, balanced plant-based wholefood diet significantly lowers your risk of dying young, dying sick, or dying from heart disease.

 “We showed that specific dietary recommendations may be useful in reducing the risk of unhealthy aging, while avoidance of the Western-type foods actually might improve the possibility of achieving older ages free of chronic disease and remaining highly functional.  Low adherence to healthy diet and lifestyle recommendations is associated with increased premature death and the Western-type diet significantly reduced the likelihood of achieving ideal health at older ages ... independent of other health behaviors such as physical activity and smoking”
Dr. Tasnime Akbaraly, PhD, of INSERM, France, and colleagues, in the American Journal of Medicine May 2013.

Study by Tasnime Akbaraly, PhD, of INSERM in Montpellier, France, et al “Does overall diet in midlife predict future aging phenotypes? A cohort study” as published in the May 2013 edition of The American Journal of Medicine; 126: 411-419, from the American Heart Association.  Akbaraly and colleagues used data from the Whitehall II cohort (phase III) and included 3,775 men and 1,575 women assessing diet and health status every 5 years from various sources.  They looked at 16 years of follow-up covering aging, nonfatal cardiovascular event, cardiovascular death, noncardiovascular death, and normal aging, crossed with the dietary patterns and adherence to the Alternative Healthy Eating Index (AHEI).  The International Whitehall II study is supported by grants from the British Medical Research Council, the British Heart Foundation, the British Health and Safety Executive, the British Department of Health, the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, the National Institute on Aging, and the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research.  As reported by MedPage Today on April 18, 2013.


 

Posted: Thursday 24 October 2013