Obese men in their 20s are twice as likely to be dead by 50

Obese men in their 20s are twice as likely to be dead by 50

They are also up to EIGHT TIMES more likely to suffer a heart attack, a fatal blood clot or get diabetes.

Obese young men were three times as likely to get any of these serious conditions as their normal weight peers by middle age, conferring an absolute risk of almost 50% compared with only 20% among their normal weight peers.  They were more than twice as likely to develop high blood pressure, have had a heart attack, or to have died.  It is important that people realize that obesity in a young age is a serious risk to long-term health.  The effect obesity has on cardiovascular death has a greater impact in younger age groups.  Previous reports have shown that young adulthood obesity also increases the risk for premature death among women so we have no reason not to suspect that these findings also hold true for women.  Obesity-related morbidity and mortality will, in decades to come, place an unprecedented burden on healthcare systems worldwide
Dr. Morton Schmidt and Henrik Toft Sorenson, from the department of clinical epidemiology at Aarhus University Hospital in Denmark.

The men studied were born in 1955 and had registered with the Danish Military Board.  This meant they were gauged by a battery of psychological and physical tests, including weight.  Over 80% were a healthy weight, 10% were overweight, 5% were underweight and 1% was obese.

What did this 33-year long rigorous study find about obese men?

  • They were eight times more likely to suffer a heart attack, a fatal blood clot or get diabetes
  • They were four times as likely to get a potentially fatal blood clot
  • They were three times as likely to get any of these serious conditions as their normal weight peers by middle age
  • They had double the rates of high blood pressure
  • They were twice as likely to have died before the age of 55
  • Youth provides no protection against the deadly effects of being overweight

Study of 6,500 Danish men followed for 33 years by Dr. Morton Schmidt and Henrik Toft Sorenson, from the department of clinical epidemiology at Aarhus University Hospital in Denmark, as published in the British Medical Journal Open in late April 2013.  As reported by The Daily Mail on 29 April 2013 and by Fox News, AFP, skynews.com and Reuters on April 30, 2013.

Posted: Friday 18 October 2013