If you read a study telling you that soft drinks are healthy then remember that the world is flat and they can prove that too…

If you read a study telling you that soft drinks are healthy then remember that the world is flat and they can prove that too…

The “Soft/cola/soda/fizzy/sugary drinks are healthy” studies come from biased ‘sugary drink industry funding’ with heavy vested interest.

“Results support the hypothesis of a master plan, based on subtle intervention, that has been developed by the food industry to instil doubt regarding the adverse effects of [sugar-sweetened beverages] and to prevent the implementation of public health interventions and policies aiming to reduce their consumption”
Dr Philippe De Wals, PhD, of Laval University, Quebec City, at the European Congress on Obesity in Liverpool, May 2013.

“Efforts by industry elements to obscure the link between soda and health outcomes are in the interests of shareholders, but certainly not the public health.  Whether or not the beverage industry has a coordinated master plan to obscure the association between soda and obesity, they certainly are motivated to downplay the importance of the relationship”
Dr David L. Katz, Yale University.

Just like the old tobacco-company-funded studies showing “cigarettes have no relationship to lung cancer”, these beneficial studies are heavily biased and untruthful:

  • A review of published studies found that ‘vested interest research’ paid for by the beverage industry finds little evidence sugary drinks cause obesity or disease
  • However the evidence from non-industry funded reviews shows the link between sugary drinks and disease is clear, robust and strong after analysing 3 meta-analyses, 3 qualitative systematic reviews and 11 qualitative nonsystematic
  • Of this analysis, 4 industry-funded studies concluded that the relationship between sugary drinks and obesity was “weak”
  • Of this analysis, 13 independently-funded studies concluded the link between sweetened beverages and obesity was “well proven”

Study by De Wal P, et al “Reviews on sugar-sweetened beverage and body weight: Determinants of their quality and conclusions” as presented at the European Congress on Obesity in Liverpool, May 2013.  As reported by MedPage Today on May 14, 2013.


 


 

Posted: Wednesday 25 September 2013