Smoking bans cut number of heart attacks and strokes everywhere else

Smoking bans cut number of heart attacks and strokes everywhere else

Heart attack, stroke, asthma and emphysema hospitalizations all fell an average of 15% after communities passed laws banning smoking in public areas.

This research is from the largest analysis of smoke-free legislation ever carried out covering 45 studies on 33 laws in American cities and states, as well as countries such as New Zealand and Germany. 

Lead author Stanton Glantz, director of the Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education at the University of California-San Francisco, and colleagues, found the following:

  • Smoking bans quickly and dramatically cut the number of people hospitalized for heart attacks, strokes and respiratory diseases such as asthma and emphysema
  • Heart attack hospitalizations fell an average of 15% after communities passed laws banning smoking in areas such as restaurants, bars and workplaces
  • Stroke hospitalizations fell 16%
  • Hospitalizations for respiratory disease fell 24%
  • The more comprehensive the law, the greater the impact
  • Heart attacks fell by 33% after a 2007 smoking ban in all workplaces in Olmsted County, Minneapolis

Study published Monday October 29, 2012 in Circulation.  Also The Mayo Clinic published a study showing the dramatic drop in heart attacks after a smoking ban in the Archives of Internal Medicine, October 2012.  As reported by USA TODAY on October 30, 2012.

 

Posted: Sunday 8 September 2013

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