Smoking ban has reduced asthma and heart attacks in the UK

Smoking ban has reduced asthma and heart attacks in the UK

Yet another study showing why this poison should be banned from Planet Earth.

After the 2007 UK smoking ban came into force, hospital admissions for heart attacks in England dropped by 2.4%, or the equivalent of 1,200 fewer heart attack patients.

Fewer people have been admitted to hospital with asthma attacks since the Scottish ban on 26 March 2006. 

A major Cochrane review of over 10 studies from North America, Italy and Scotland, found a direct drop in hospital heart attack admissions in all of them and a drop in the numbers of deaths, after smoking bans had been passed.

In a YouGov poll of 4,099 adults, weighted to make it representative of the UK population, only 12% knew that smoking can cause ovarian cancer, while the proportions who knew that smoking was linked to cancer of the bowel (13%), cervix (13%), kidney (15%) and liver (19%) were almost as small. However, 89% knew it can cause lung cancer.

Study by Anna Gilmore and colleagues, at Bath University, published in the British Medical Journal, 2012.  The researchers have found that after the 2007 UK smoking ban came into force, hospital admissions for heart attacks in England dropped by 2.4%, or the equivalent of 1,200 fewer heart attack patients.  Study carried out in Scotland, published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 2010; found fewer people have been admitted to hospital with asthma attacks since the Scottish ban on 26 March 2006.  The researchers looked at over 21,000 child asthma admissions from 2000-2009.  Before the legislation, preschool asthmatic admissions were rising by 9% a year.  After the ban, they dropped by 18.4% for preschool children and 20.8% for those aged five to 14.  As reported by guardian.co.uk on Friday 29 June 2012.

 


 

Posted: Saturday 7 September 2013

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