DRY JULY Alcohol blamed for poor survival in liver disease patients

DRY JULY Alcohol blamed for poor survival in liver disease patients

If you have liver disease or cancer then the only advice about alcohol is to not drink at all.

What did this published 2013 Brighton and Sussex Medical School study find?

  • Patients who stop drinking are almost three times likely to survive
  • The estimated five-year survival was 75% in those who stopped drinking, compared to 24% in those with alcohol relapse
  • At the end of the study, 97% of all deaths were directly related to liver disease

Study by Dr Jonathan Potts, Research Fellow, and Dr Sumita Verma, Senior Lecturer and Honorary Consultant, Hepatology, of Brighton and Sussex University Hospital (BSUH) and Brighton and Sussex Medical School (BSMS).  It was published on the Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics journal online library in July 2013.  This study is one of the first to assess the long-term outcome for in-patients with severe alcoholic hepatitis (SAH).  The researchers reviewed medical records of patients admitted to BSUH with SAH from 2006-2011 and found that 58% were dead at the end of the study period, with 97% of these deaths directly related to the liver disease.  As reported by Medical Express on July 25, 2013. 


 

Posted: Monday 29 July 2013

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