Breast cancer screening not shown to reduce deaths says 40 year study

Breast cancer screening not shown to reduce deaths says 40 year study

The Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine has found after analyzing 40 years of regular mammogram data, that they do not lower death rates for breast cancer.

“Our data shows there is no evidence of an effect of mammographic screening on breast cancer mortality at the population level over an observation period of almost 40 years.  The effects are not large enough to be detected at the population level”
Lead researcher Toqir Mukhtar, June 2013.

“We permuted the data in a number of different ways, over an observation period of 39 years, but the data show that, at least as yet, there is no evidence of an effect of mammographic screening on population-level breast cancer mortality”
Study published in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, June 2013.

The published research in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine says “The researchers from the department of public health at the University of Oxford analysed mortality trends across England before and after the introduction of the NHS breast screening programme in 1988 and specifically looked at mortality statistics from the Oxford region because it was the only area in the country which recorded all causes of death on the death certificate, not just the underlying cause, at the start of the programme”.

These researchers concluded that “population-based mortality statistics for England do not show a past benefit of breast cancer screening”.

As reported by The Press Association and The Guardian on Tuesday 11 June 2013.


 

Posted: Monday 17 June 2013

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