Red meat raises gestational diabetes risk and nuts lower it

Red meat raises gestational diabetes risk and nuts lower it

New data from the highly credible Nurses’ Health Study II shows how eating meat significantly raises the risk for developing gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), while eating nuts reduces it.

“Our findings suggest that among women of reproductive age, substitution of vegetable protein (nuts, seeds, wholegrains and legumes primarily), for animal protein, may potentially lower GDM risk.  Meat consumption has been found to be associated with long-term weight gain, type II diabetes, coronary artery disease, stroke, and all-cause mortality, while nuts are a good source of vegetable protein, are rich in mono- and polyunsaturated fats, fiber, and magnesium, and have a low glycemic index, all of which have been associated with improved insulin sensitivity and a reduced risk for type II diabetes”
Wei Bao, MD, PhD, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

What were the numbers from this meta-analysis?

  • Eating red meat in particular appeared the most harmful
  • Swapping one serving per day of red meat with fish was associated with a 33% lower risk for GDM
  • Swapping one serving per day of red meat with nuts was associated with a 51% lower risk for GDM
  • Swapping one serving per day of red meat with legumes was associated with a 33% lower risk for GDM
  • Swapping 5% of energy intake from plant carbohydrates to meat was associated with a 29% increase in GDM risk
  • Swapping 5% of energy from meat to plant protein would result in a 51% lower GDM risk
  • “Meat consumption has been found to be associated with long-term weight gain, type II diabetes, coronary artery disease, stroke, and all-cause mortality, while nuts are a good source of vegetable protein, are rich in mono- and polyunsaturated fats, fiber, and magnesium, and have a low glycemic index, all of which have been associated with improved insulin sensitivity and a reduced risk for type II diabetes”

Study by Wei Bao, MD, PhD, an epidemiologist with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, Maryland, and colleagues.  The researchers published the study in Diabetes Care, February 1, 2013.  After adjustment for weight, age, dietary factors, including fat and cholesterol intake, and other cofounders, for 15,294 women, greater consumption of animal protein was associated with significantly increased GDM risk, while higher vegetable protein intake was associated with significantly reduced risk.  This study was funded by the Intramural Research Program of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health. The Nurses’ Health Study II was funded by research grants from the National Institutes of Health.  As reported by Medscape on February 6, 2013.


 

Posted: Saturday 23 March 2013

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