Obesity about to overtake tobacco as the leading avoidable cause of premature death worldwide

Obesity about to overtake tobacco as the leading avoidable cause of premature death worldwide

During the last several decades, there has been a systematic underestimation of the hazards of obesity.

What does Dr. Charles H. Hennekens, M.D., Dr., P.H., from the Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine, at Florida Atlantic University, say in his report as published in the February 2013 issue of the American Journal of Medicine? 

  1. Obesity is becoming as big a hazard worldwide as cigarette smoking
  1. This generation of adolescents are more obese and less physically active than their parents and already have higher rates of type II diabetes
  1. As this current generation of American children and adolescents reach middle age, morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease will increase
  1. It is likely that the current generation of children and adolescents in the U.S. will be the first since 1960 to have higher mortality rates than their parents due mainly to cardiovascular disease, including coronary heart disease and stroke
  1. In the U.S. today, 40% of adults age 40 and over have metabolic syndrome, a constellation of obesity, lipid abnormalities, hypertension and insulin resistance, a precursor of diabetes
  1. These people require aggressive management to lower their high risks of premature death and disability
  1. The epidemic of obesity in the United States as well as globally, contributes to avoidable and premature deaths from cardiovascular disease, cancer and other causes
  1. Obesity is the leading avoidable cause of the current epidemic of type II diabetes in the U.S., which is also increasing worldwide.

“I am deeply concerned that the United States is the fattest society in the world and likely to be the fattest in the history of the world.  Unfortunately, most people prefer prescription of pills to prescription of healthy lifestyles.  The export of our diet and lifestyle, which increases rates of obesity, together with tobacco, to developing countries will result in cardiovascular disease emerging as the leading killer in the world”
Dr. Charles H. Hennekens.

Study report by Dr. Charles H. Hennekens, M.D., Dr., P.H., from the Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine at Florida Atlantic University, with co-author Felicita Andreotti, M.D., Ph.D., professor of medicine at Catholic University in Rome, Italy, as published in the American Journal of Medicine, February 2013.  As reported by sciencedaily.com on February 1, 2013.


 

Posted: Monday 4 February 2013

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