Genetic obesity risk heightened by sugary drinks

Genetic obesity risk heightened by sugary drinks

Two new studies confirm the relationship between genetics, body mass index and obesity risk is much higher in adults who drink the most sugar-sweetened drinks. 

Katie Bayne, Coca-Cola’s president of sparkling beverages in North America, in an exclusive interview with the Detroit Free Press and USA Today as published on June 8, 2012, said There is no scientific evidence that connects sugary beverages to obesity”.

She clearly is someone who either disregards scientific proof altogether, or who somehow knows better than the researchers here looking at over 30,000 people?

Your genetic expression is dominated by food interaction. 

Yet again, more common sense science shows where the blame truly lays – at the door of the soft drink companies and big food companies.

The researchers looked over data on 6,934 women from the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS), 4,423 men from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS) and 21,740 women from the Women’s Genome Health Study (WGHS). 

Lu Qi, MD, PhD, of the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston said These data suggest that persons with greater consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages may be more susceptible to genetic effects on adiposity.  Viewed differently, persons with a greater genetic predisposition to obesity appeared to be more susceptible to the deleterious effects of sugar-sweetened beverages on BMI.  Our findings underscore the need to test interventions that reduce the intake of sugary drinks as a means of reducing the risk of obesity and related diseases.  These data support a causal relationship among the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages, weight gain, and the risk of obesity”. 

Dr Sonia Caprio, of Yale University saidThis study provides strong evidence that there is a significant interaction between an important dietary factor – intake of sugar-sweetened beverages – and a genetic-predisposition score, obesity, and the risk of obesity.  Hence participants with a greater genetic predisposition may be more susceptible to the adverse effects of sugar-sweetened beverages on obesity; this is a clear example of gene-environment interaction”. 

Study by Qi Q, et al “Sugar-sweetened beverages and genetic risk of obesity” as published in the New England Journal of Medicine, September 2012; DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1203039. 

Study by Caprio S “Calories from soft drinks - do they matter?” as published in the New England Journal of Medicine, September 2012; DOI: 10.1056/NEJMe1209884.  

As reported by MedPage Today on September 21, 2012 in collaboration with ABC News. 

Posted: Sunday 2 December 2012

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