Heart disease drug increases risk of death in heart disease patients...

Heart disease drug increases risk of death in heart disease patients…

Dr Claude Elayi, of the Gill Heart Institute at the University of Kentucky in Lexington, and colleagues reported that “After adjustment for clinical characteristics and comorbidities, the heart drug was associated with 41% elevated all-cause mortality…”

The Digoxin drug seems to raise your risk of mortality

  • Those who did take digoxin were more likely to die during the mean 3.5 years of follow-up
  • The 69% of patients who took digoxin within 6 months of randomization, during the study, or both were more likely to die during the mean 3.5 years of follow-up
  • Cardiovascular mortality remained 35% elevated after controlling for clinical and demographic variables
  • Arrhythmic deaths were 61% more common among digoxin-treated patients
  • The effect didn’t appear to differ by sex
  • The risk was elevated 37% among patients without heart failure
  • The risk was elevated 41% among patients with heart failure
  • A step-wise regression analysis looking for explanatory variables showed the biggest attenuation in the all-cause survival link was adjustment for NYHA functional class, which dropped the mortality excess from 66% to 49%, though still statistically significant
  • The lowest estimate for the excess risk was 36%

Study by Whitbeck MG, et al “Increased mortality among patients taking digoxin-analysis from the AFFIRM study” as published in the European Heart Journal 2012; DOI: 10.1093/eurheartj/ehs348 and presented in the AHA Atrial Fibrillation Summit: A Conference Report from the American Heart Association.  The researchers examined nonrandomized use of digoxin among the 4,060 patients in the AF Follow-Up Investigation of Rhythm AFFIRM trial.  They found that cardiovascular mortality and arrhythmic mortality were similarly elevated with digoxin in the post-hoc AF Follow-Up Investigation of Rhythm Management (AFFIRM) trial analysis.  These large observational studies have shown an impact on all-cause and cardiovascular mortality.  As reported by MedPage Today on November 27, 2012.

Posted: Thursday 29 November 2012

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