Cigarette packing challenge thrown out by the Australian High Court

Cigarette packing challenge thrown out by the Australian High Court

This is the first step in the end of tobacco and a massive blow to the cigarette companies.  Just watch the rest of the world follow.  Attorney General Nicola Roxon and Health Minister Tanya Plibersek said to the AAP and The Age in a joint statement “This is a victory for all those families who have lost someone to a tobacco-related illness.  For anyone who has ever lost someone, this is for you. No longer when a smoker pulls out a packet of cigarettes will that packet be a mobile billboard.  We have taken on big tobacco and we have won”.

The bottom line is that cigarettes sold in Australia after December 1, 2012 will come in dull, olive-brown packs featuring graphic health warnings and images of cancer-riddled mouths, blinded eyeballs and sickly children.  The all-important brand names that suck in children will be restricted to small, generic type.  

The laws are the first in the world and the toughest in the world, setting a brave new international standard, with New Zealand expected to follow suit and countries such as the United Kingdom, France, South Africa and China considering the measure. 

Bring it on.

The AAP and The Age also reported Edmund Bateman, managing director of Primary Health Care, saying “this is the one good public health thing that’s been done in Australia in the past decade.  I hear what they say about cigarettes - that it’s the only licensed product that actually is designed to kill. So what they’re agreeing to is to have a product that’s licensed available to people to kill themselves.  I think the answer is they should get the courage to ban them.”

Mark Fitzgibbon, chief executive of health insurer NIB, agreed “If I was voting in Parliament, I’d support it.  We know that it’s so detrimental to people’s health.  People say, ‘Well, what’s next, beer?’  But the difference is, you can have one or two beers; it may even improve your health.  There’s some science to say that.  But any amount of tar in your lungs is detrimental to your health.  It’s poison.”

Health Minister Tanya Plibersek said to the AAP and The Age that when tobacco companies warned about price cutting, they were targeting young people. “Young people are price sensitive, so they are admitting that their business model is about recruiting new, young smokers.”

Full story here: http://www.theage.com.au/national/push-grows-for-total-smoke-ban-20120815-249dn.html

As reported by theage.com.au on August 16, 2012.

Posted: Thursday 16 August 2012

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